Category Archives: Featured Friend

LPCI Featured Friend: Pheasants Forever

Meet the Pheasants Forever, one of the Lesser Prairie-Chicken Initiative’s  key partner organizations. Pheasants Forever plays an important role in overseeing LPCI’s Strategic Watershed Action Team.

LPCI succeeds through the combined resources and know-how of many public agencies, nonprofit organizations, universities, and private businesses. Our partners expand LPCI’s field delivery, science, and communications capacity. 

Download the pdf of our latest Featured Friend story, or click the PDF below to read:

 

FEATURED FRIEND: Meet the Bird Conservancy of the Rockies

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Meet the Bird Conservancy of the Rockies, one of LPCI’s partner organizations. The Bird Conservancy plays a vital role in the scientific research that helps LPCI ensure that we’re doing the right things in the right places to benefit lesser prairie-chickens.

Download the pdf of our latest Featured Friend story.

LPCI succeeds through the combined resources and know-how of many public agencies, nonprofit organizations, universities, and private businesses. Our partners expand LPCI’s field delivery, science, and communications capacity. 

 

Research Helps Fine-Tune Conservation Efforts

How do we know if habitat conservation efforts are really helping lesser prairie-chickens and other species? Through on-the-ground research. In 2016, Bird Conservancy of the Rockies completed its eighth field season of breeding bird surveys on public and private land across the western US. Their survey, known as the Integrated Monitoring in Bird Conservation Regions (IMBCR) program, is one of the largest breeding bird monitoring studies in North America.

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“By working with people and combining science and stewardship, we can ensure the right practices are delivered in the right places to benefit multiple grassland bird species including lesser prairie-chicken.” ~Tammy VerCauteren, Executive Director

Through IMBCR, LPCI and Bird Conservancy of the Rockies have teamed up to survey private ranches in the southern Great Plains to investigate the impact of LPCI conservation practices. Preliminary findings show that species richness of grassland-obligate songbirds was greater in LPCI landscapes than non-LPCI, and that species richness correlated with lesser prairie-chicken occupancy.

Additionally, findings from their on-going research— including a 2016 report that showed considerable positive effects of prescribed grazing and Conservation Reserve Program enrollment on lesser prairie-chicken habitat occupancy—helps LPCI fine-tune management strategies to deliver the greatest conservation return on investment, provide predictability for conservation actions, and ensure mutually beneficial solutions for landowners and wildlife.

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Landowner workshop on birdfriendly range management practices, Scott City, KS.

“Bird Conservancy aims to conserve species of concern through meaningful relationships with the private landowners who work those landscapes,” says Adam Beh, Bird Conservancy stewardship director. “Landowners are essential to the research by allowing field technicians access to their land—Bird Conservancy is deeply thankful to these committed landowners.”

About the Bird Conservancy

PrintBird Conservancy of the Rockies conserves birds and their habitats through an integrated approach of science, education, and land stewardship. Their work spans from the Rockies to the Great Plains, Mexico, and beyond. Their mission is advanced through sound science, achieved through empowering people, realized through stewardship, and sustained through partnerships.

Contact

Adam Beh, Stewardship Director  |  970-482-1707 ext 12  |  adam.beh@birdconservancy.org  www.birdconservancy.org

Featured Friend: Western Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies

Screen Shot 2016-07-10 at 10.54.55 PMMeet the Western Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies, a key partner within the NRCS-led LPCI partnership. LPCI succeeds through the combined resources and know-how of many public agencies, nonprofit organizations, universities, and private businesses. LPCI partners expand the field delivery, science, and communications capacity for lesser prairie-chicken conservation.

Read/download the pdf of our Featured Friend, the Western Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies.

 

One of LPCI’s core partners, the Western Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies has taken an innovative and unprecedented approach to lesser prairie-chicken conservation. In partnership with the five states that are home to the lesser prairie-chicken, WAFWA created the Lesser Prairie-Chicken Range-wide Conservation Plan (RWP) to address the needs of this species while providing a mechanism for regional industry to continue operating.

Brad Odle, right, is one of several WAFWA regional biologists who works with landowners to voluntarily manage rangelands for lesser prairie-chickens.

Brad Odle, right, is one of several WAFWA regional biologists who works with landowners to voluntarily manage rangelands for lesser prairie-chickens.

Completed in 2013, the plan established priority conservation areas, population goals, and habitat goals that all conservation partners are working towards. It also established a voluntary mitigation program for industries developing land within the lesser prairie chicken’s range. Mitigation fees support voluntary habitat conservation planning and management on private agricultural lands. The only plan of its kind endorsed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service, the RWP was incorporated into the Section 4(d) Special rule at the time of listing in 2014.

Meet WAFWA

About

Established in 1922, the Western Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies represents 19 states and 4 Canadian provinces and supports sound resource management to conserve native wildlife. WAFWA’s lesser prairie-chicken work is part of a broad suite of wildlife conservation initiatives the organization carries out.

Role With LPCI

In addition to funding private land conservation practices, WAFWA provides funds for LPCI field staff who work one-on-one with agricultural producers and conducts monitoring to assess the success of conservation efforts, including an annual aerial population survey.

Contact

Jim Pitman, Lesser Prairie-Chicken Conservation Delivery Director, 620-208-6120, jim.pitman@wafwa.org

For more information: www.wafwa.org